Tag Archive for: Africities

Africities Explained To Youth!

As part of the communication actions around the Africities 9 summit scheduled from 17 to 21 May 2022 in Kisumu, Kenya, UCLG Africa and the Institut Supérieur de l’Information et de la Communication (ISIC), Rabat combine their efforts with the establishment of 3 newsrooms (Radio, TV, Print) composed of students of ISIC. This podcast is produced in the framework of this program.

UCLG Africa is particularly interested in youth through its seven priority areas of action in its strategic vision GADDEPA 2.0 (2021-2030).

Let us recall that ISIC and UCLG Africa collaborate closely through a MoU (Memorandum of Understanding) signed in March 2021

The podcast is in French.

 

The “Vox Pop” capsule of the 9th edition of the Africities Summit

As part of the communication actions around the Africities 9 summit scheduled from 17 to 21 May 2022 in Kisumu, Kenya, UCLG Africa and the Institut Supérieur de l’Information et de la Communication (ISIC), Rabat combine their efforts with the establishment of 3 newsrooms (Radio, TV, Print) composed of students of ISIC. This podcast is produced in the framework of this program.

UCLG Africa is particularly interested in youth through its seven priority areas of action in its strategic vision GADDEPA 2.0 (2021-2030).

Let us recall that ISIC and UCLG Africa collaborate closely through a MoU (Memorandum of Understanding) signed in March 2021

The audio is in french.

 

 

Lupita Nyong’o: Goodwill Ambassador for the 9th Africities Summit (PRESS RELEASE)

The 9th edition of the Africities Summit is scheduled to take place on May 17 to 21, 2022 in Kisumu, Kenya. Placed under the High Patronage of His Excellency, Uhuru Kenyatta, President of the Republic of Kenya, the theme chosen for the summit is: “The role of intermediary cities in Africa in the implementation of the United Nations 2030 Agenda and of the African Union´s Agenda 2063”.

 

For the first time, the Africities Summit will have a Goodwill Ambassador: Ms. Lupita Nyong’o, Oscar-winning Kenyan actress, star of the movie “Black Panther” and its upcoming sequel “Wakanda Forever”. One of the goals of this edition is to mobilize the African and Afro-descendant diaspora to begin the journey towards African renaissance with their fellow citizens who have remained on the continent, as well as with all people of goodwill interested in the development, integration, and unity of Africa.

 

Organized every 3 years over a 5-day period, alternately in the different regions of Africa, the Africities Summit is the largest democratic gathering organized on the African continent. This flagship event of United Cities and Local Governments of Africa (UCLG Africa) organized in partnership with the Government of Kenya, the Council of Governors of Kenya (CoG), and the County of Kisumu will for the very first time be held in an intermediary city.

See the Africities 9 Summit official promotional spot  here .

Discover Kisumu on video here .  

Made your  media accreditation here .

The media Kit is available here .

Find all the information: Presentation / Program / Speakers on: www.africities.org

Press contact: Gaëlle Yomi: media@africities.org

 

 

Road to Africities 9: The big interview with… M. Sule Salifu, Mayor de Tamale (Ghana): “This Summit must be an avenue for sharing experience and best practices among the leadership of the various cities “

In the run-up to the Africities 9 summit scheduled for 17 to 21 May 2022 in Kisumu (Kenya), under the theme: “The contribution of African intermediary cities to the United Nations 2030 Agenda and the African Union’s Agenda 2063”, UCLG Africa is conducting a serie of interviews with mayors of intermediary cities on the continent. For this third issue our guest is Mr. Sule Salifu, Mayor of Tamale (Ghana). The mayor relies on the youth of his population to achieve and maintain strong economies based on industry, agriculture and services.  For him, Africities Summit is a unique opportunity to share experience and best practices among leaders of different cities, to network with colleagues and development partners, and to attract investment to his city, either through direct investment or through public-private partnership agreements.

Watch the video or read the interview.

Can you introduce your city?  

My name is Sule Salifu, Tamale Metropolitan Assembly Chief Executive. Tamale became the capital town of the then Northern territories of Ghana in 1907, during the colonial era. Due to its central location, Tamale serves as a hub for all administrative and commercial activities in the Northern territory. Even though the northern territory has now been split into five regions, Tamale remains the capital of the current Northern region. Tamale Metropolitan Assembly, together with its adjoining Assembly, forms the greater Tamale, third largest city in Ghana that is said to be the fastest growing in the West African sub region. It has a combined population of 716,455 according to the 2021 population housing and census of Ghana. It is a cosmopolitan city with a fair blend of peri-urban and rural communities which are mainly agrarian. With its youthful population of about 40%, the metropolis has the potential of achieving and sustaining solid industrial, agricultural and service-driven economies, as the largest urban center in Northern Ghana that is also centrally located along an important route that links Ghana key cities along the North-South economic development corridor and the cross-border to Burkina Faso, Mali and Niger, the city has witnessed strong urbanization growth, though increasingly accompanied with urbanization challenges including traffic, urban sprawl and infrastructure management. It has tremendous opportunities. Tamale city has the essential infrastructure for both air and road connectivity, making it an ideal location to be positioned as a service hub. It has educational institutions, hospitals, several banks, telecommunication networks and logistics related to transportation of goods to and from Burkina Faso and beyond. These make the city a natural center for domestic and foreign investors, especially in the following industries: logistics, information, technology, medicine, education, hospitality and tourism. The most prominent tourist attractions in Tamale are the Damba and Fire Festivals, which are celebrated with pomp and pageantry with the display of traditional woven smokes adorned by both males and females.

Intermediate cities occupy a strategic place in Africa’s urbanization. By 2050, the majority of new urban dwellers will settle in cities of less than 500,000 inhabitants. How is your municipality preparing for this change? 

In order to cope with the new urban dwellers, the Tamale Metropolitan Assembly has developed a master plan known as Greater Tamale Metropolitan Area Structure Plan, which will help to address in an acceptable and orderly manner the challenges of the city and position it as the commercial educational industrial hub of the region in the northern parts of Ghana, and neighboring countries like Burkina Faso, Mali and Niger. With this plan, we would effectively address the perennial devastating floods, sanitation, waste management, as well as transportation, water and sprawl issues associated with a rapidly expanding city. This city plan becomes a major investment promotion document. It is a broad and practical implementation document for government agencies in the planning and development of Tamale. As a systematically planned and consensus built document, it will ensure synergy of development in the short and long-term to transform Tamale and its environments.

Do you think that cities like yours receive enough attention from public policies? 

I must admit that cities like ours receive some attention from the government, though limited. For instance, the Ghana Urban Development Policy document is in place to guide the group of cities like Tamale. Also some funding, though inadequate, is provided through the urban development grants for the provision of municipal infrastructure and services to cope with the increasing population and its attendance effects.

The Africities 9 Summit Scheduled from 17 to 21 May 2022 in Kisumu (Kenya) places intermediate cities at the heart of the debate, with the theme: “The contribution of African intermediate cities to the United Nations Agenda 2030 and the African Union Agenda 2063”. What are your expectations for this meeting which brings together local authorities as well as financial institutions, civil society organizations and development partners at the continental and international levels?   

My expectations include the following: An avenue for sharing experience and best practices among the leadership of the various cities, an opportunity to network with colleagues and development partners, and marketing of my city to the outside world to attract investment either through direct investment or public-private partnership arrangements.

The global challenge of climate change can only be met through the territorialization of Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs). How is your municipality dealing with the consequences of climate change in the daily lives of your populations?   

The city of Tamale is equally affected by climate change, especially high temperature, deforestation, perennial flooding in some communities during heavy rains, and drought in some years. To deal with the consequences of climate change in the daily life of the population, the Tamale Metropolitan Assembly, in partnership with development partners and private sectors have been dealing with the issues by the adoption of climate smart agriculture, reforestation of degraded land through the Green Ghana Initiative of the government, the use of renewable energy, development of urban road systems to include bicycle lanes in the metropolis for the many people who use bicycles as means of transport, waste management recycling and compositing plants being built to deal with liquid, medical and solid waste generated from the metropolis, construction of drains to reduce flooding the city, among others.

How can intermediate cities like yours contribute to national wealth creation, local economic development and local democracy?   

As an intermediate city, Tamale contributes to national wealth creation, local economic development and local democracy by serving as the link between the rural and urban population as the aggregation and distribution channel for goods to the needy areas, thereby enhancing the income of both populations, and by providing high quality services in the hospitality, education, medical and technology sectors to the residents and neighboring or surrounding communities and towns, as well as by being a hub for skills development, job creation and employment, and strengthening the Metropolitan Assembly Unit Committees and civil society organizations through training and capacity building so as to enhance local democracy or grassroots participation.

Intermediate cities play an important role in rapid urbanization in developing countries, balancing territories, providing services to surrounding populations, creating jobs and generating income, and mitigating rural migration, rather than large cities. Can you share with us your city’s experience on these aspects? 

As an intermediary city, Tamale attracts many people who are seeking job opportunities and skills development, resulting into its rapid urbanization. In view of this, there is an abundant skilled and unskilled workforce available for recruitment in any productive venture. Also, the city has better educational and health service facilities which are pool factors for many people in the city. The influx of people into the city for varied reasons have resulted in pressure being put on the social infrastructure and municipal services which place heavy burden on city authorities. Because of the springing up of urban slums in some communities, the authorities have to pull down buildings and remove structures to pave way for the construction of roads and lanes to take care of emergency situations when they do occur. With the new developing areas, the Building Inspectorate Unit of the Assembly ensures regular monitoring to avoid unplanned development in the city. The city has large markets that promote higher productivity and increase income for both producers and those in the value chain taking advantage of positive externalities and economies of scale.

 

 

9th Africities Summit: The City of Kisumu Hosts the Largest Meeting with the Africa of Local Governments (PRESS RELEASE )

The city of Kisumu in Kenya will host the 9th edition of the Africities Summit from May 17 to 21, 2022, under the High Patronage of His Excellency, Uhuru Kenyatta, President of the Republic of Kenya. The theme of the summit is: “The role of intermediary cities in Africa in the implementation of the United Nations 2030 Agenda and the African Union Agenda 2063”.

Organized every 3 years over a 5-day period, alternately in the different regions of Africa, the Africities Summit is the largest democratic gathering organized on the African continent. This flagship event of United Cities and Local Governments of Africa (UCLG Africa) organized in partnership with the Government of Kenya, the Council of Governors of Kenya (CoG),  and the County of Kisumu will for the very first time be held in an intermediary city.

More than 5,000 participants are expected to discuss the 2030 and 2063 Agendas which call for urgent reflection on resilient and sustainable urbanization in Africa, given that by 2050 most of the African population will live in cities, and that most city dwellers will settle in intermediary cities. The improvement of the living conditions of the African populations and the economic and social structural transformation of the African continent are therefore closely linked to the way in which the achievement of the 2030 and 2063 Agendas will be approached in the African intermediary cities, which are undoubtedly the places where Africa will have to invent its own approach and its own development trajectory.

The challenge is to learn the lessons from the serious health crisis that the world has just experienced, the limits of the planetary ecosystem, the warnings of the International Group of Experts on Climate (IPCC) on the impact of climate change, and the extent of the disorders and instabilities that will result, in order to reflect on the definition of a new development trajectory for Africa. From the outset, this trajectory should take into account the need to shift towards a mode of production and consumption that is more restrained in terms of consumption of natural resources and discharges into nature, a mode of production and consumption that is  low carbon, respectful of the balance between human beings and other living species, socially more inclusive and fairer, ecologically more sustainable, and overall more resilient.

Kisumu is therefore the place chosen by the community of local authorities in Africa to initiate this healthy reflection. This reflection will be addressed during the thematic sessions, sessions on local policies and strategies, and open sessions organized during the first three days of the Summit. This reflection will also be at the heart of the debates and proposals for specific days organized on the major subjects that mobilize the attention of mayors and leaders of local authorities on the continent: Climate Day; Diaspora Day; Digital Day; Culture Day; Urban Planning Day; Housing Day; Women’s Day; Youth Day; and Africities Investment Forum.

The Africities Summit includes a political segment on the last two days, during which meetings of ministers, mayors and leaders of local governments, Regional Economic Communities, and development partners take place. These meetings will consider proposals and recommendations from thematic sessions, sessions on local policies and strategies, and open sessions. They end with a tripartite political dialogue meeting between ministers, mayors and leaders of local governments, and development partners with the aim of defining and adopting a roadmap on the effective implementation of the 2030 Agenda  and of Agenda 2063.

At the same time as part of the Summit and at the same location will  be held the International Exhibition for Cities and Local Authorities. The Africities Exhibition offers to institutions, economic operators, academia and research, civil society organizations the opportunity to exhibit their experiences, know-how, methods, tools, products, in response to the requests and needs in terms of support to local governments  for the implementation of their mandates. The Africities Exhibition also makes it possible to organize B2B meetings with local governments, which could possibly lead to the conclusion of contracts between protagonists.

The Summit ends with a gala dinner during which the attributes of honorary members will be distributed to the personalities selected by the Executive Committee of UCLG Africa as well as the Africities prizes awarded to local governments that have made remarkable achievements that can inspire their counterparts.

The 9th Africities  Summit will also serve  as a framework for the elective general assembly responsible for appointing the members of the organization’s governing bodies. Indeed, the elective general assembly of UCLG Africa will be held on May 19, 2022, preceded on May 18 by the general assemblies of the Network of Locally Elected Women of Africa (REFELA) and the Network of Young Local Elected Officials of Africa (YELO).

Find all the information: Presentation / Program / Speakers on: www.africities.org

Press contact: media@africities.org

 

 

 

Road to Africities 9: The big interview with…Prof. Peter Anyang’ Nyong’o, Governor of Kisumu County (Kenya): “We may have to come up with a common understanding at the continental level on how to restructure our cities “

In the run-up to the Africities 9 summit scheduled for 17 to 21 May 2022 in Kisumu (Kenya), under the theme: “The contribution of African intermediary cities to the United Nations 2030 Agenda and the African Union’s Agenda 2063”, UCLG Africa is conducting a serie of interviews with mayors of intermediary cities on the continent. For this second issue our guest is the Honorable Peter Anyang’ Nyong’o, Governor of Kisumu (Kenya). He reveals the ambition of his city to improve its green coverage, the urgency for Local Governments of the continent to agree their violins to face the problems related to governance in Africa. The host city of Africities also wishes that during the 5 days of the Summit, Kisumu is a connected city with free Wi-Fi access. In advance, Governor Peter Anyang’ Nyong’o welcomes participants to Kisumu, “the city of infinite possibilities”.

Watch the video or read the interview.

Can you introduce your city?

Kisumu is the third largest city in Kenya, sitting almost on the Equator, to the West of Nairobi, on Lake Victoria, the second largest fresh water lake in the world. Therefore, the fishing industry is one of the most important industries in the Kisumu County, of which I am the Governor. Kisumu is also known for its sporting population, with young people who excel in soccer, hockey and other games, and who have won several medals in international and African matches. As we sit here today, Kisumu is going to hold the 9th edition of the Africities Summit, as an intermediary city. Indeed it is, because the population has been growing and we do believe that by the year 2050, the population of Kisumu may be easily 3 million. One of the reasons why the population is growing very fast is because the economy is also growing. The county has a strong agricultural sector which supplies the city with agricultural commodities, both for consumption and for export to other parts of East Africa. We are therefore talking about a very dynamic, lively and entertaining city. We have a lot of entertainment sports in the county, on the lake, and anybody who comes to Kisumu will come to a city that is typical of cities which sit on great sizes of water resources.

In 2010, Kenya had a new constitution which restructured the system of government. We say that we have 48 governments in Kenya, one national and 47 counties, separate but interdependent. Kisumu happens to be one of those default systems of government along other 13 counties around Lake Victoria. So we have formed an economic and cultural community called the Lake Region Economic Block to synergize our development across these 14 counties, because we realize that we trade with each other and have close communication. We are also closely related to neighboring countries through Lake Victoria: at least four other counties around Lake Victoria are borders touching Uganda or Tanzania. Therefore, coming together in the Lake Region Economic Bloc, with headquarters in Kisumu, provides us with the potential for economic integration and economic growth in the future. Kisumu is definitely a gateway to a large market. It is the epicenter for a lot of activities. Most people in the region come here to meet, have conferences, or invest in housing and other businesses, so Kisumu really acts more or less as the capital of the Lake Region Economic Bloc.

Intermediate cities occupy a strategic place in Africa’s urbanization. By 2050, the majority of new urban dwellers will settle in cities of less than 500,000 inhabitants. How is your municipality preparing for this change? 

One of the ways we are preparing for this change is by having a local, detailed geophysical and special plan of the city, to know exactly where people live, what kind of natural resources and infrastructure we have, and what kind of problems we have in terms of use of land and environmental control, because environment is a very important issue. During the COVID pandemic, it was realized that we need to revive urban farming because access to market beyond Kisumu became difficult, but people had to be fed. You know, human beings are very innovative. All of a sudden, we saw corn gardening in the city. It provided people with meals daily, and corn gardening has been proven to be a very effective way of producing food. We also found during this pandemic, that when there are lockdowns in the city and people can’t travel to the central business district to have access to malls and other facilities, they need to have them in their neighborhood. Following our special geophysical plan for future urban planning, which we have already initiated today, the neighborhood must be integrated in this planning, and not just in terms of apartments, but also in terms of what people need on a day-to-day basis: markets, playgrounds, health facilities… This must be integrated in planning so that agglomeration of settlement within the city can actually be as self-sufficient as possible.

We can’t do this without technology. We need it to collect our revenue, for example. We must have internet to collect data. Therefore, the old way of doing things by pen and paper, which is a danger for increasing non-accountability of fund revenues, for example, is becoming a thing of the past. We intend, during the Africities Summit, to make Kisumu a free Wi-Fi city, where you can access to Wi-Fi and call people as well as get informed, which is much easier than calling someone in a phone booth.

Do you think that cities like yours receive enough attention from public policies? 

That is one of the reasons we have the Committee of Urban Affairs and Urban Development in the Council of Governors. It’s a very important Committee because we do realize that, in the Constitution, we have to produce a devolved government although we have an Urban Areas and Cities Act, which deals specifically with city problems. The government has not internalized the fact that planning for cities and financing cities development is a very important issue in counties like ours. We must also plan for the growth of small towns, because they are growing exponentially into the future. Therefore, planning for urban development and financing it, giving urban areas resources to look after their need, is something we must cater for, especially in the Division of Revenue Bill used in the Constitution to divide revenue between the national government and the county government.

Our Committee has so far been dependent mainly on money from the World Bank for urban development. We cannot continue to forever depend on donor-funded projects in urban areas; it must be domain that is available in the treasury dispatched to counties under the Division of Revenue Bill.

The Africities 9 Summit will be crucial for intermediary cities…

During the Summit, it will be important for us to compare notes with other cities in Africa, to find answers to the following questions: what is the mode of financing of urban areas in other parts of Africa? How do they envisage dealing with emerging problems of growing and exponentially growing urban areas? Do we, in Kenya, have any lessons that we want to share with others? What lessons do others have to share with us? The answers will help Africa develop a common pool of knowledge and ideas on how to deal with urban development and with the problems that the urban areas face. I think it is very important because we may find that what happens in Burkina Faso may be relevant to what happens in Kenya.

The Africities 9 Summit Scheduled from 17 to 21 May 2022 in Kisumu (Kenya) places intermediary cities at the heart of the debate, with the theme: “The contribution of African intermediate cities to the United Nations Agenda 2030 and the African Union Agenda 2063”.  What are your expectations for this meeting which brings together local authorities as well as financial institutions, civil society organizations and development partners at the continental and international levels?  

My expectation is that we may have to come up with a common understanding at the continental level on how to restructure our cities and how to deal with problems of governance in Africa as a whole. In certain countries, local governments enjoy tremendous power and resources from their national government, whereby you may find a country where 40% of the national budget is dedicated to local governments, either in terms of states or provinces. For example, Nigeria is a federal system that has states. South Africa has provinces, but they do not have as much political power as the states of Nigeria. Here in Kenya, we have counties, which is something between what provinces are in South Africa and what states are in Nigeria. We must, during the Summit, ask ourselves, what differences does this make, if you have one model of local government, rather than the other? Is there one that works better in the African situation? Or should we expect a multiplicity of systems precisely depending on the history of a country? Does this multiplicity of systems still provide a future for citizens living in intermediary cities? Especially as they quickly become metropolises, because they are not going to remain intermediary cities forever. That transition from being intermediary to being a metropolis must be very carefully managed and resourced if we want to avoid some of the problems that Africa’s metropolises have, like urban congestion and lack of proper structures of habitation. When you want to build a metro, the built environment is so dense that it costs you an arm and a leg to build! I always said that we should avoid catching the Mumbai flu: when Mumbai wanted to build a metro, they found it very difficult. While the city had grown over time, the need for a metro was not envisaged and it became a very big problem, whereas Mexico City, which is very big and has a huge population, did not have many difficulties building a metro underground. We need to get these lessons and find out if there are certain things we may not do today but must envisage doing them later as these cities grow, for cheaper because we precisely planned ahead of time.

The global challenge of climate change can only be met through the territorialization of Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs). How is your municipality dealing with the consequences of climate change in the daily lives of your populations?  

It is not easy, because we never envisaged the effects of climate change. Nobody knew, so nobody can pretend that we have the answers to that question, but we must confront the problem. We are improvising where we can; taking drastic measures to prevent its consequence in the future if we have to.  I think the most important thing is to understand, what is this animal called climate change? How does it affect us? Can we avoid climate change, or can we mitigate it because we cannot avoid it? At the moment, we can definitely avoid it, because we know its causes. One of them is carbon emissions. We can start reducing carbon emissions in our own city, Kisumu, where motorbikes are the most popular form of transport, and perhaps the biggest polluters. We had two choices, either ban motorbike transportation, which we couldn’t,  or make it safe and free from carbon emission, which we are doing by gradually turning our petroleum powered motorbikes into electricity powered ones, because electricity is clean energy.

Secondly, we must improve the green coverage in our city. The first thing we did when we came into local government was to rehabilitate all our parks and protect them from encroachment and destruction, at a time when the reduction of green spaces in Kisumu was alarming. Thirdly, climate change recently led to the rise of the level of the lake we live next to and that was very detrimental to economic activities on the lakefront. Homes, schools and hotels were destroyed, and there was a tremendous loss of development around the lakefront. We must protect riparian land now. We should make sure that, while we are fighting carbon emissions, we are also protecting water resources, so that we can manage the rise of water levels of the rivers and lakes, in the way in which we have managed the waterfront in good time.

How can intermediate cities like yours contribute to national wealth creation, local economic development and local democracy?  

As I told you, Kenya is composed of 48 governments, one national and 47 counties, which means that the counties really are where people live. A Kenyan lives somewhere in a county, a devolved unit. A Kenyan does business and creates wealth somewhere in a county, the total sum of wealth creation of all these counties is what comes to be the national GDP or the Gross National Product, because productive activities and wealth creation happens in these counties. Now, they may happen because national government itself stimulates investment in these counties, therefore, the initial capital that initiates development comes from the treasury that is still developing Kenyan’s capital, but it may also happen that this wealth creation is initiated by the counties themselves, through their own unique development programs and policies.

If Kenya’s GDP is going to grow exponentially, then the two levels of government, which are interdependent, must commit to wealth creation, both at the local and national level. Kisumu County is finding in areas in which the national government has the resources, even more needed resources to undertake development, like what they did at the port, which we ourselves cannot do. That is important to the Kenyan economy, as well as the county’s economy.

The wealth created at the port could easily be counted as part of the GDP of the county but it is really the GDP of the nation. Now, I will tell you that when we create a good environment for investment both by the private and the public sector, it will add towards wealth creation within the county and part of its GDP. This is taken into account by the National Statistical Authority when it calculates the GDP’s of counties. A correlation has been found between good economic policies, better systems of accountability in counties and their rate of GDP growth. We distinguish the Gross Domestic Product growth of the counties from the GDP of the nation as whole. If we do not have policies and regulations that are conducive to investment, of course we shall not grow rapidly. Now, one of the areas in which we must have good policies is the agricultural sector, because it’s the biggest part of our economy. We are capable of producing low volume, high price agricultural commodities, like spices. They are low volume because you can grow them in a very small piece of land, they do not require as much intensive labor as the crops that require large pieces of land, but they feature fantastic good prices in the market. So we must begin retooling ourselves in the agricultural sector in Kisumu County, and create a sector that produces low volume, high price commodities, because an agricultural sector that depends entirely on high volume, low price commodities sometimes do not do very well in the competitive market internationally:  the cost of transportation is rather high. Imagine exporting maize rather than exporting spices to Saudi Arabia, you will pay more for they are lifting them there, so you would prefer to use shipping, which takes a longer time, when you can put spices in a plane that will enter Saudi Arabia within no time and get you a lot of money, so we must begin thinking of a new way of growing our GDP in the county.

Intermediate cities play an important role in rapid urbanization in developing countries, balancing territories, providing services to surrounding populations, creating jobs and generating income, and mitigating rural migration, rather than large cities. Can you share with us your city’s experience on these aspects?  

Sometime ago, before infrastructure was improved in Kenya, people from the region went to work in Mombasa or Nairobi for the Kenya Railways and Harbours Corporation. They worked on railways, in the port of Mombasa, the Thika plantations… Policemen and teachers were also employed in big urban centers like Nairobi. There was a big export of labor from our region, and they stayed for long, often not even coming back for Christmas. They finally came back later when they retired, which means whatever they have earned was invested in the cities where they worked. Lately, with devolution, there has been the opposite movement of human resources. This has lead to other people who are not necessarily residents of Kisumu County coming to invest in it. We have seen an increased backflow of skills and expertise to the County. It is very interesting because we might assume that people who are coming back might create unemployment, yet they actually come back because they have money to invest in something, so they actually increase employment. More people are staying in the rural areas of Kisumu because they have to produce food for the new comers in the city, which is an expanding market for rural commodities from the countryside.

Middle class people leave Nairobi and come back to Kisumu to build houses. A single person needs a watchman, a cook and a domestic cleaner. Those are three workers for one house. Given the numbers of houses being built in some areas, the amount of employment created is not small.

What is your message of invitation to the participants of the 9th Africities Summit? 

Welcome to Kisumu, the city of limitless opportunities, as we begin our journey for Africa’s renaissance and for intermediary cities which will become the metropolises of Africa in the next 20 years.

New Dates for the Africities Summit in Kisumu , Kenya 

 

Following consultations with the Government of Kenya, the Council of Governors of Kenya and the lead partners in the organization of the Summit, namely UCLG World, UN Habitat, and United Nations Economic Commission for Africa (UNECA),  the Executive Committee of the ninth edition of the Africities Summit to be held in Kisumu, Kenya, informs the public and interested institutions, organizations, associations, and stakeholders, that the ninth edition of the Africities  Summit initially scheduled on 26 to 30 April 2022, will be held on 17th to 21st May 2022 in Kisumu, Kenya.

As a reminder, the theme of the 9th Africities Summit is: “The Role of Intermediary Cities of Africa in the Implementation of Agenda 2030 of the United Nations and the African Union Agenda 2063”.

These two Agendas call for the urgent need to develop resilient and sustainable urbanization in Africa, cognizant of the fact that by 2050 the bulk of African population will be living in cities, and that the majority of city dwellers will settle in intermediary cities. The improvement of the living conditions of the African people and the economic and social structural transformation of the African continent is therefore closely linked to the way the realization of these agendas will be addressed in African intermediary cities, which are for sure the places where Africa will be inventing her own approach and trajectory to sustainable human development based on her realities but also taking stock of the knowledge and experiences accrued across the world. As much as possible, the development models to be implemented in Africa should be more energy efficient, low carbon, more inclusive, and more resilient.

Do join us in Kisumu on 17 to 21 May 2022 at the Africities Summit, to be part of this endeavor in a place where Africa will be defining her new development trajectory based on African intermediary cities.

 

Download press release here

For further information, please contact:

Gaëlle Yomi : Tel : + 212 610 56 71 45

e-mail : gyomi@uclga.org

Visit the UCLG Africa website : www.uclga.org

UCLG Retreat: UCLG Africa’s Priorities in the Global Agenda

From February 15 to February 22, 2021, UCLG Africa took part in the seventh edition of the annual retreat of the world organization of Local and Regional Governments (United Cities and Local Governments, UCLG).

The second day of the seminar under the theme of “UCLG: A Global Community that Cares” had the Africa chapter moderate the first plenary.

The goal was to share with the great UCLG family ideas and points of view on Africa’s priorities on the global agenda of local authorities.

During his speech, the Secretary General of UCLG Africa, Mr. Jean Pierre Elong Mbassi, paid tribute to the late Mr. Kadir Topaz, former mayor of Istanbul and president of UCLG (2010-2016), who died on February 13, 2021. Mr. Mbassi also reaffirmed his desire that all activities of UCLG Africa be turned towards the future and aligned with the Pact for the Future, supported by the world organization UCLG.

Ms. Rahmatouca Sow, Advisor for International Relations and Political Affairs of UCLG Africa, presented the work plan of the organization focused on the renewal of its strategic priorities, with the aim of making UCLG Africa a “one stop shop” for Local Africa over the 2021-2030 decade (GADEPPA 2.0).

The new strategic orientation includes 3 pillars (Advocacy and mobilization for decentralization, Capacity and knowledge management of local authorities and National Associations, Access to funding and Technical assistance of local authorities and their associations) and fundamentals that ensure the institutional development of UCLG Africa.

These pillars are anchored around 7 priority themes that will enable African local and regional authorities to implement the African Union’s Agenda 2063, the United Nations’ Agenda 2030 and other global development agendas. In this new approach, the regional offices of UCLG Africa will occupy a central place for an offer of local services to members. These themes are: 1- Local Economy and Finance, 2- Gender and youth 3- Climate, biodiversity and food systems 4- Basic services and localization of SDGs, 5-Migration, 6-Culture, 7- Peace and security.

The state of play of preparations for the Africities 9 summit (April 26-30, 2022, Kisumu-Kenya) was also presented during the session.

The question-and-answer session allowed other partners such as UNDP to appreciate the new vision of UCLG Africa and to consider a more systematic collaboration with the organization.

In addition to this session moderated by UCLG Africa, the staff of the organization participated in several other panels organized as part of the annual UCLG retreat.

For more information on the annual UCLG seminar, click here. 

The Importance of the New Urban Agenda to African Cities and Municipalities.

It is now widely appreciated by cities and local governments that it is impossible to deal with Africa’s growth and poverty challenges without dealing with the rapid urbanisation issues that affect the sustainability of our cities and human settlements. After the completion of UN Habitat’s rst Assembly UCLG Africa explores how African Cities and Local Governments have contributed to the New Urban Agenda, and what innovative solutions have been introduced that have impacted on sustainable development. The UN Habitat Assembly’s mandate is to promote socially and environmentally sustainable towns and cities with the goal of providing adequate shelter for all.

Global city leaders and managers from 127 Member States adopted five resolutions at the final session of the assembly that included:

– Approval of a new strategic plan for 2020-2023
– Safer cities and human settlements;
– Capacity building for the implementation of the New Urban Agenda and the urban dimension of the 2030
Agenda for Sustainable Development;
– Gender equality to support inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable cities and human settlements;
– and Enhancing urban-rural linkages for sustainable urbanization

Read more here

Read the resolutions of the UCLG Africa Statutory meetings of November 2018

The resolutions of the UCLG Africa Statutory meetings held in November 2018 as a prelude to the 8th Africities summit (20-24 November 2019, Marrakesh) are available and can be download below:

Minutes of the General Assembly of UCLG Africa;

Minutes of the 19th session of the Executive Committee of UCLG Africa;

Minutes of the Meeting of the Panafrican Council of UCLG Africa .

The next UCLG Africa Statutory meetings will be held from 17 to 21 June 2019 in Cairo, Egypt.